BIOCELL

About the Journal

BIOCELL is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal on molecular and cellular biosciences. The journal welcomes high quality original research articles, review papers, communications, perspectives, commentaries, etc. Topics of interests include but are not limited to: Cellular Biochemistry, Structural & Molecular Biology, Cellular/Molecular Biology, Immunology, Pathology & Neurobiology, Cell Signaling, Regenerative Biology & Stem Cells, Cancer Biology, RNA Biology, Genomics, Transcriptomics, Proteomics & Metabolomics, Plant Molecular & Cellular Biology.

Indexing and Abstracting

Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE): 2020 Impact Factor 1.254; Journal Citation Report/Science Edition (JCR); Scopus; Scopus Citescore (Impact per Publication 2020): 1.0; SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper 2020): 0.523; Sociedad Argentina de Investigaciones en Bioquímica y Biología Molecular (SAIB); Portico, etc.

  • Aneuploidy: An opportunity within single-cell RNA sequencing analysis
  • Abstract Single-cell sequencing data has transformed the understanding of biological heterogeneity. While many flavors of single-cell sequencing have been developed, single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) is currently the most prolific form in published literature. Bioinformatic analysis of differential biology within the population of cells studied relies on inferences and grouping of cells due to the spotty nature of data within individual cell scRNA-seq gene counts. One biologically relevant variable is readily inferred from scRNA-seq gene count tables regardless of individual gene representation within single cells: aneuploidy. Since hundreds of genes are present on chromosome arms, high-quality inferences of aneuploidy can be made… More
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  • Nanotherapeutics approaches to improve the efficacy of CAR-T cells in solid tumors
  • Abstract Adoptive cell therapy and Immune Checkpoint Blockade Inhibitors have recently revolutionized the field of oncology. However, these types of immunotherapeutic approaches have limited success in treating solid tumors. In particular, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells efficacy is hampered by immunosuppressive signals in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and by a limited infiltration of re-infused T cells to the tumor site. The field of nanobiotechnology applied to oncology is also rapidly expanding. Nanoparticles-based delivery systems can be employed to modulate the activity of immune cells present in the TME enhancing the efficacy of CAR-T cells. Interestingly, nano-backpacks can be attached to CAR-T… More
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  • The bacteriophage mu lysis system–A new mechanism of host lysis?
  • Abstract Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria and can choose any one of the two alternative pathways for infection, i.e., lysis or lysogeny. Phage lysis is one of the conventional biological processes required to spread infection from one bacterium to another. Our analysis suggests that in the paradigm bacteriophage Mu, six proteins might be involved in host cell lysis. Mu has a broad host range, and Mu-like phages were found in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. An analysis of the genomes of Mu and Mu-like phages could be useful in elucidating the lysis mechanism in this group of phages. A detailed… More
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  • Mechano-Sensing and shear stress-shielding by endothelial primary cilia: structure, composition, and function
  • Abstract Primary cilium is an antenna-like and non-motile structure protruding from the apical surface of most mammalian cells including endothelial cells lining the inner side of all the blood vessels in our body. Although it has been over a century since primary cilia were discovered, the investigation about their mechano-sensing and other roles in maintaining normal functions of cardiovascular system has just started in recent years. This focused review aims to give an update about the current literature for the role of endothelial primary cilia in blood flow mechano-sensing and shear stress-shielding. To do this, we first summarized the characteristic features… More
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  • Benefit of prophylactic bronchodilator with β2 adrenergic agonist in ischemia-reperfusion-induced lung injury
  • Abstract Primary lung graft dysfunction could significantly attribute to ischemia-reperfusion lung injury (IRLI) during transplantation surgery. β2-adrenergic agonists were one of the bronchodilators that had been well-established in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with anti-inflammatory potency. By applying the model of isolated rat lung, we evaluated the efficacy of short-acting β2-agonist inhalation to ameliorate ischemia-reperfusion damage. The experiment protocol was 180 min of global ischemia and then reperfusion for 60 min. In the β2-agonist inhalation group, aerosolized albuterol was administrated prior ischemia procedure. Increased weight ratios of wet to dry lung and microvascular permeability were characterized… More
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  • Effects of docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid supplementation on gene expression and contractile force of rat cardiomyocytes in primary culture
  • Abstract While fatty acids play essential roles in the physiology of the myocardium, conventional culture media contain little lipid. We previously revealed that rat neonatal myocardium mainly contains docosahexaenoic (DHA), linoleic (LA), and arachidonic (AA) acids as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and these contents in cultured cardiomyocytes derived from fetal rats were markedly lower than those in the neonatal myocardium. In this study, we first assessed the effects of supplementation of DHA, LA, or AA on the fatty acid contents and the percentage change of contractile area in primarily cultured rat cardiomyocytes. Based on this assessment, we then evaluated the effects… More
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  • TaVNS reduces inflammatory responses in a L-NAME-induced rat model of pre-eclampsia
  • Abstract Pre-eclampsia is characterized by an excessive maternal inflammatory response. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) has been shown as the efferent arm of a vagal reflex with the potential to limit inflammatory responses. Therefore, in this study, the CAP regulation through the nervous vagal stimulation (VNS) reduced the severity of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced pre-eclampsia was determined in a rat model. Rats were given 125 mg/kg/day of L-NAME via subcutaneous injection on gestational day (GD) 10–16. In addition, the rats were treated by active or sham electrical stimulation once a day during GD 13–19. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), urinary albumin, and… More
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  • Relationship between PON-1 enzymatic activity and risk factors for pesticide poisoning in farmers from the Cienega, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Abstract Paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes organophosphate pesticides. The presence of polymorphisms in PON-1 (L55M and Q192R) decreases its enzyme activity and increases the risk of central nervous system (CNS) toxicity in occupationally exposed farmers, leading to chronic degenerative diseases and death. We studied 103 farmers in the region of Cienega Jalisco, Mexico, which were exposed mainly to organophosphate pesticides. We used serum and plasma samples to assay PON-1 activity and perform polymorphism analysis (L55M and Q192R) using qPCR and TaqMan probes, respectively. For both polymorphisms, there was high percentage of heterozygosity (55 LL = 0.19, LM = 0.75,… More
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  • Thymoquinone as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster model
  • Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most common forms of dementia. Cognitive dysfunction and memory loss are the two main clinical symptoms of AD. Drosophila melanogaster models of AD, which are based on overexpression of human amyloid β (Aβ) or human tau (hTau) protein, have been used to study the mechanism underlying AD and to screen potential therapeutic compounds. Drugs that are currently available for AD provide only symptomatic relief. Huge unmet medical needs exists to slow, stop, or reverse the progression of AD. Thymoquinone (TQ) is an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa (NS) and possesses various pharmacological… More
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  • Isolation, purification and structure elucidation of three new bioactive secondary metabolites from Streptomyces lividans AM
  • Abstract Microorganisms are a huge mine of bioactive metabolites, and actinomycetes are one of the very active groups in this area. In this article, we are concerned about the full taxonomical characterization of Streptomyces lividans AM, isolated from Egyptian soil. This isolate produced three new bioactive metabolites, namely: 1-Nona-decanoyl,4-oleyl disuccinate (1), filoboletic acid; (9Z,11E)-8,13-dihydroxy octadeca-9,11-dienoic acid (2), and sitosteryl-3β-D-glucoside (3). Extensive 1D and 2D NMR and HR-mass spectrometry were used to elucidate the structures of the three compounds. Moreover, ten known compounds were also identified. The antimicrobial activity of the producing organism and newly reported compounds (1–3) was investigated against a… More
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  • iPhosD-PseAAC: Identification of phosphoaspartate sites in proteins using statistical moments and PseAAC
  • Abstract Phosphoaspartate is one of the major components of eukaryotes and prokaryotic two-component signaling pathways, and it communicates the signal from the sensor of histidine kinase, through the response regulator, to the DNA alongside transcription features and initiates the transcription of correct response genes. Thus, the prediction of phosphoaspartate sites is critical, and its experimental identification can be expensive, time-consuming, and tedious. For this purpose, we propose iPhosD-PseAAC, a new computational model for predicting phosphoaspartate sites in a particular protein sequence using Chou’s 5-steps rues: (1) Benchmark dataset. (2) The feature extraction techniques such as pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), statistical… More
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  • GC/MS-based differential metabolic profiling of human peptic ulcer disease to study Helicobacter pylori-induced metabolic perturbations
  • Abstract Helicobacter pylori infection has been significantly linked to Peptic Ulcer Disease and Gastric Cancer. Metabolomic fingerprinting may offer a principal way of early diagnosis and to understand the molecular mechanism of H. pylori-induced pathogenicity. The rationale of the study is to explore the underlying distinct metabolic mechanisms of H. pylori-induced PUD and to identify potential biomarkers for disease diagnosis and associated risks using Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. GC/MS-based analytical method was used to compare metabolic profiles of healthy controls (N = 20) and peptic ulcer patients (N = 45). Acquired metabolomic data were analyzed by constructing a diagnostic model using principal… More
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  • Invasive Stratified Mucin-Producing Carcinoma (ISMC) of the uterine cervix: An analysis of 6 cases with distinctive clinicopathological features
  • Abstract Invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (ISMC) is a recently described histologic variant of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated endocervical adenocarcinoma, as the putative invasive counterpart of the stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE). ISMC can display variable architectural patterns and usually coexists with other more conventional types of HPV-associated carcinomas, which makes diagnosis and differential diagnosis of ISMC is difficult for pathologists. Moreover, the prognosis of ISMC is still controversial. We analyzed 6 ISMCs with detailed pathological and clinical information. Intraepithelial lesion, including 1 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and 1 SMILE, was found. Various architectures were observed (including nest, glandular, solid, trabecular, and… More
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  • Data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that skin aging-related proteins differ between men and women
  • Abstract The skin is the largest organ of the human body, and its aging is visible to the naked eye. The aging rate of men and women is slightly different. This study compared the protein expression of skin samples on the curved forearms of 11 healthy women and 9 healthy men. Quantitative proteomics analysis found that the expression of epidermal proteins in men and women of the same age group was different. Compared with female skin, in male skin, 20 proteins were upregulated, and 7 proteins were downregulated. These data suggest that men and women have differences in the speed of… More
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  • Exendin-4 inhibits the survival and invasiveness of two colorectal cancer cell lines via suppressing GS3Kβ/β-catenin/NF-κB axis through activating SIRT1
  • Abstract This study examined if the anti-tumorigenesis effect of Exendin-4 in HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer (CRC) involves modulation of SIRT1 and Akt/GSR3K/β-catenin/NF-κB axis. HT29 and HCT116 cells were treated either with increasing levels of Exendin-4 (0.0-200 µM) or with Exendin-4 (at its IC50) in the presence or absence of EX-527 (10 µM/a selective SIRT1 inhibitor) or Exendin-4 (9-39) amide (E (9-39) A) (1 µM/an Exendin-4 antagonist). In a dose-dependent manner, Exendin-4 inhibited cell survival, but enhanced levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in both HT29 and HCT116. In both cell lines and at it has an IC50 More
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  • Retinoic acid affects basic cellular processes and SOX2 and SOX18 expression in breast carcinoma cells
  • Abstract Genetic and molecular heterogeneity, together with intrinsic and acquired resistance to therapy, represent the major obstacles to the successful treatment of different types of breast carcinoma. Increasing evidence demonstrates that SOX transcription factors in breast carcinomas could act both as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and have been associated with tumor stage and grade, poor prognosis, and therapy resistance. Both SOX2 and SOX18 overexpression has been correlated with poor prognosis in breast carcinomas, and these genes are recognized as potential antitumor targets. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of retinoic acid (RA), a well-known cyto-differentiating agent, on breast carcinoma cells… More
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  • KIFC1 overexpression promotes prostate cancer cell survival and proliferation in vitro by clustering of amplified centrosomes via interaction with Centrin 2
  • Abstract Mitotic kinesin KIFC1 plays critical roles in mitosis by regulating the spindle length, pole formation, and known for clustering extra centrosomes in cancer cells. Centrosome clustering is associated with the survival of cancer cells, but this phenomenon remains obscure in prostate cancer (PCa). The present study demonstrated that PCa cells showed centrosome amplification and clustering during interphase and mitosis, respectively. KIFC1 is highly expressed in PCa cells and tumor tissues of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) patients. Up-regulation of KIFC1 facilitated the PCa cell survival in vitro by ensuring bipolar mitosis through clustering the multiple centrosomes, suggesting centrosome clustering could be a… More
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  • Genetic diversity in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) germplasm from three secondary geographical origins of diversity using SSR markers
  • Abstract Indo-Burmese region was the primary center of eggplant diversity from where the crop extended to several secondary origins of diversity. In this study, the genetic diversity among fifty-six eggplant accessions collected from three countries was assessed using sixteen polymorphic SSR markers to determine suitable parents for heterotic hybridization. The estimation of genetic diversity among the population of three countries (Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Thailand) varied from 0.57 to 0.74, with Shannon’s index value of 0.65. The mean value of expected heterozygosity and Nei’s index was 0.49, with an average PIC value of 0.83. A dendrogram was constructed based on UPGMA (unweighted… More
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  • Control of seed born mycobiota associated with Glycine max L. Merr. seeds by a combination of traditional medicinal plants extracts
  • Abstract Seeds from soybean collected from different commercial markets were surveyed for seed-borne fungi. Ninetyeight fungal colonies were isolated all over three monthly isolations constituting twenty-two fungal species. The isolated fungi were belonging to the genera: Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cephalosporium, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Curvularia, Fusarium, Macrophomina, Mucor, Penicillium, Rhizoctonia, Rhizopus, Sclerotium, Stemphylium, and Verticillium. Assay of the antifungal activity of four ethanolic extracts of clove, cinnamon, garlic, and mint was carried out against the most common fungal species (Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporium, and F. moniliforme), which significantly reduced the growth of tested fungi. Clove extract recorded the highest… More
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  • Effects of lead (Pb)-induced oxidative stress on morphological and physio-biochemical properties of rice
  • Abstract

    In rice, high concentration of lead (Pb) can cause phyto-toxicity affecting several physiological functions. Cultivation of rice varieties that are resistant to Pb-induced oxidative stress is an important management strategy in Pb-contaminated soils. In the current study, we evaluated four different rice cultivars for their response to Pb-induced stress. Three japonica type cultivars X-Jigna, Ediget, and Furat, and one Indica type cultivar Amber 33 were grown in soil containing different Pb concentrations (0 mM, 0.6 mM, and 1.2 mM). The soil was treated with 0 mM or 0.6 mM or 1.2 mM Pb solution one month prior to rice seedling… More

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